Tennis Elbow: The Most Misnamed Orthopedic Condition

Fewer than 10% of patients that have tennis elbow actually play tennis. In addition, the medical term for this condition is "lateral epicondylitis." This also is misnamed. Why? The lateral epicondyle is the bony prominence on the outside of the elbow. This sometimes stubborn condition is not a bone problem, but a tendon problem, actually involving what we call the common extensor tendon. This also can be a very humbling condition. It can cause significant pain with some simple, everyday activities- lifting a coffee cup, shaking hands, pulling your bedsheets, just to name a few. Why you ask? Stress to this tendon is not only related to the weight of a lifted object, but also the arm and wrist position. Certain positions cause overloading of the damaged and/or inflamed tendon. Turning our attention to treatment options, there are traditional and innovative options. At Impact Sports Medicine, we actually specialize in both types:

Traditional:

1) REST and changing the biomechanics- how and how much you lift, grip and grab

2) A wrist splint- yes, immobilizing the wrist and forearm unload the tendon far more than immobilizing the elbow

3) A cortisone injection- in our hands, 90% of patients experience relief with an ultrasound-guided injection. However, since tendon damage is often the cause of the stubborn pain, cortisone, at times, may only provide temporary benefit.

4) Physical Therapy- helpful in changing the biomechanical problems that led to the tendon damage. However, the benefit can be limited if tendon is partially torn.

Innovative:

1) The Tenex procedure- a true game-changing minimally-invasive procedure. This is our favorite option for those patients that have not improved with the traditional treatments. Local anesthesia only, a tiny incision, 2 minutes of tendon treatment with a small probe, no stitches, covered by insurance and a 90% success rate. How does that sound? We've loved this procedure for 6+ years.

2) Regenerative injections- platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and amniotic membrane are very solid choices, utilizing solutions rich in human growth factors to stimulate healing of the tendon.

3) Nitroglycerin patches- placed on the skin over the tendon, these are good choices for those patients needing something extra, but prefer a treatment that is non-invasive. These work by producing nitric oxide in the tissues, which then can be responsible for tendon healing.

In summary, we hate that you have "tennis elbow," but love the opportunity to treat you. It's our mission to make this common cause of elbow pain leave your life and never return! Let us know if we can help.